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Industrial Design Students Reinvent the Pencil

Industrial Design Students Reinvent the Pencil

Holon Institute of Technology (HIT) designers Luka Or and Keren Tomer asked their students to reinvent one of the world's most ubiquitous drawing tools. Not since its invention in 1564 has the humble pencil received such a drastic and functional upgrade. So many head slapping "why didn't I think of that" moments in this project. From roller pencils to a wide assortment of graphite brushes, and even the teeth pencil for kids to write letters to the Tooth Fairy - the amount of imagination and ingenuity in these designs offer a novel spin on something most people take for granted as an optimal design.


Industrial Redesign of the Pencil
Student Evgeny Barkov give the pencil a prehistoric overhaul with these wood and polymer pencils

Industrial Redesign of the Pencil
Student Noy Meiri created these roller pencils to facilitate pattern making in fashion design.

Industrial Redesign of the Pencil
Student Yam Amir creates a tethered tube whose constraints provide interesting possibilities.

Industrial Redesign of the Pencil
Student Yael Hasid separates form and function with his +- pencils for writing and erasing

Industrial Redesign of the Pencil
Student Eitan Bercovich designed a pencil for children writing a letter to the tooth fairy

Industrial Redesign of the Pencil
Student Gal Yacobi merges pencil and stamp which can write and seal letters.

Industrial Redesign of the Pencil
Student Ofra Oberman created a series of brush pencils designed for a more flowing sketching experience

Closing Thoughts

As a new year approaches, we can't help but be inspired by such fundamental innovation. If there is any resolution we have for 2016, it's to cultivate our curiosity as productively and brilliantly as these young minds have.

In that spirit, we at Fine Print wish you a happy and prosperous New Year. Here's to a world of new possibilities in 2016!

Photography by Luka OrAll images courtesy of Holon Institute of Technology.
See more on their website.
Published on December 31st, 2015